Speaking Market into Product. Speaking Product into Market.

In answer to the question: what is product marketing?

Product Marketing speaks market into product, and product into market.

The role of the Product Marketer is as an expert and advocate for a product’s market. Whether they own or inform commercial strategy, the product marketer works to discover, describe, and define a population of buyers both now and into the future. Through a deep understanding of the competitive landscape and of individual stakeholder personas, the product marketer is tasked with crafting a message that is clear, consistent, and compelling, and is responsible for delivering that message in ways that are relevant and impactful.

Organizationally, Product Marketing sits between Product Management, Field Marketing, and Sales. As an expert in the product’s addressable market, it is the responsibility of Product Marketing to work closely with Product Management to ensure that features on product roadmaps are competitive, produce real value for the customer, and are aligned to the business’s overall commercial strategy. That is what it means to speak the market into product.

But product marketing also has to speak product into the market. Here, Product Marketing creates messaging for use by field marketing when developing high impact campaigns for demand and lead generation. This involves crafting language, positioning, and strategy documents to enable field campaigns, but also collaborating with field marketing to ensure that campaigns are consistent with core message, accurate, and impactful. The messaging that Product Marketing creates is also delivered to Sales, but translated according to the specific needs of that function. This involves the creation of tools and collateral, of course, but also enablement. In order to most effectively enable sales, it is vital for product marketing to have a close relationship with sales team, actively work to understand their unique needs, and deliver training and materials that actually make a difference in the field. Too often, Product Marketers lack a sales background, and so lack empathy. They focus their efforts on product and field marketing support, and merely throw materials over the fence at sales. This not only represents a missed opportunity to garner feedback from the field, but also a missed opportunity to have a significant impact on morale as sales is left to flounder and go it alone.

The role of product marketing is to speak market into product, and product into market. If we take this seriously, then the role of a product marketer ultimately becomes that of an advocate:

  • an advocate of customers who have real needs that we can meet in product,
  • an advocate for product managers who want to see commercial success and widespread product adoption,
  • an advocate for marketing functions that work earnestly to create high impact campaigns, and
  • an advocate for sales colleagues who face huge challenges in the field and are desperate for education and enablement.

When I think about product marketing, then, I ultimately think about the importance of the position to the people it serves, and feel strongly that putting service at the center as a core value of the role increases collaboration, mitigates against an imbalance in priority between product, marketing, and sales, and generates enthusiastic alignment within an organization in support of a common vision.

Product Roadmaps: Just One Damn Thing After Another?

Dostoyevsky once wrote (paraphrasing) that every man needs both a place to be, and a place to go. Others very cleverly talk about the difference between roots and routes, arguing that in order for humans to reach their full potential, they need to know both who they are, and have a vision for what they wish to become.

The same applies to products.

Unfortunately, product managers and humans alike rarely think deeply about either being or becoming. They think of life (that of the themselves or their products) as simply the cumulative effect of adding one thing after another. True, this may be life in the strictest and barest sense, but would anyone call this ‘flourishing?’ I think not.

Let’s talk about product roadmaps.

A product roadmap is NOT a list of features on a timeline. A roadmap is not a prioritized list of feature requests. A product roadmap, insofar as it IS a roadmap, MUST begin with a clear idea of what the product is, and what it aspires to become. It must have roots and routes.

Of course, the way that a product thinks of its roots and routes is always subject to change in the same way as a human being may change their self-conception and aspirations. What is VITAL, however, is that they HAVE a self-conception and a vision for the future.

You can’t steer a parked car.

It’s incredibly easy for product managers to fall into the same trap as humans in general, thinking of their roadmaps in terms of ‘what’

  • WHAT am I going to do?
  • WHAT am I going to do next?
  • WHAT are my product gaps?
  • WHAT are my customers requesting?

But a product roadmap should NOT first and foremost be concerned with ‘what’ questions. It needs to instead be laser focused on the ‘how.’

The ‘what’ is fundamentally about vision.

  • What is it?
  • What should it become?

Only once these questions are asked and answered can a product manager start thinking about creating and prioritizing specific features and enhancements. A clear vision gives a product a ‘why,’ and makes it possible to frame a roadmap as the ‘how.’

In the absence of this vision work (which is hard to do), however, there is no roadmap. There is no beginning. There is no end. Without a clear vision framed in terms of what a product is, and what it aspires to become, a ‘product roadmap’ is simply one damn thing after another.

The difference between IT and Ed Tech

In a recent interview with John Jantsch for the Duct Tape Marketing podcast, Danny Iny argued that the difference between information and education essentially comes down to responsibility. Information is simply about presentation. Here are some things you might want to know. Whether and the extent to which you come to know them is entirely up to you.

In contrast, education implies that the one presenting information also takes on a degree of responsibility for ensuring that it is learned. Education is a relationship in which teachers and learners agree to share in the responsibility for the success of the learning experience.

This distinction, argues Iny, accounts for why books are so cheep and university is so expensive. Books merely present information, while universities take on an non-trivial amount of responsibility for what is learned, and how well.

(It is a shame that many teachers don’t appreciate this distinction, and their role as educators. I will admit that, when I was teaching, I didn’t fully grasp the extent of my responsibility for the success of my students. I wish I could go back and reteach those courses as an educator instead of as a mere informer.)

If we accept Iny’s distinction between information and education, what are the implications for what we today call educational technologies, or ‘Ed Tech’? As we look to the future of technology designed to meet specific needs of teachers and learners, is educational technology something that we wish to aspire to, or avoid?

Accepting Iny’s definition, I would contend that what we call educational technologies today are not really educational technologies at all. The reason is that neither they nor the vendors that maintain them take specific responsibility for the success or failure of the individual students they touch. Although vendors are quick to take credit for increased rates of student success, taking credit is not the same as taking responsibility. In higher education, the contract is between the student and the institution. If the student does not succeed, responsibility is shared between the two. No technology or ed tech vendor wants to be held accountable for the success of an individual student. In the absence of such a willingness or desire to accept a significant degree of responsibility for the success of particular individuals, what we have are not educational technologies, but rather information technologies designed for use in educational contexts. Like books…but more expensive.

With the advent of AI, however, we are beginning to see an increasing shift as technologies appear to take more and more responsibility for the learning process itself. Adaptive tutoring. Automated nudging. These approaches are designed to do more than present information. Instead, they are designed to promote learning itself. Should we consider these educational technologies? I think so. And yet they are not treated as such, because vendors in these areas are still unwilling (accountability is tricky) or unable (because of resistance from government and institutions) to accept responsibility for individual student outcomes. There is no culpability. That’s what teachers are for. In the absence of a willingness to carry the burden of responsibility for a student’s success, even these sophisticated approaches are still treated as information technologies, when they should actually be considered far more seriously.

As we look to the future, it does seem possible that the information technology platforms deployed in the context of education will, indeed, increasingly become and be considered full educational technologies. But this can only happen if vendors are willing to accept the kind of responsibility that comes with such a designation, and teachers are willing to share responsibility with technologies capable of automating them out of a job. This possible future state of educational technology may or may not be inevitable. It also may or may not be desirable.


RESOURCES

‘Good marketing’ isn’t good marketing: Why marketers should get out of the language game

Marketers like to make up new terminology and distinctions. This is easy to do because, in the absence of particular domain expertise, they don’t know the ‘right’ language. Reading is hard. Knowledge acquisition takes time. And marketers need to produce. So they create novel constellations of terms. Instead of exploring the world as it is, they invent the world for themselves. They do all this under the banner of ‘branding.’ When potential customers see this, they smirk and call it ‘good marketing.’ ‘Good marketing’ isn’t good marketing. Continue reading

How ed tech marketers are bad for higher education

A lot of ed tech marketers are really bad. They are probably not bad at their ‘jobs’ — they may or may not be bad at generating leads, creating well-designed sales material, creating brand visibility. But they are bad for higher education and student success.

Bad ed tech marketers are noisy. They use the same message as the ‘competition.’ They hollow out language through the use and abuse of buzz words. They praise product features as if they were innovative when everyone else is selling products that are basically the same. They take credit for the success of ‘mutant’ customers who — because they have the right people and processes in place — would have been successful regardless of their technology investments. Bad marketers make purchasing decisions complex, and they obscure the fact that no product is a magic bullet. They pretend that their tool will catalyze and align the people and processes necessary to make an impact. Bad marketers encourage institutions to think about product first, and to defer important conversations about institutional goals, priorities, values, governance, and process. Bad marketers are bad for institutions of higher education. Bad marketers are bad for students.

Good marketing in educational technology is about telling stories worth spreading. A familiar mantra. But what is a story worth spreading? It is a story that is honest, and told with the desire to make higher education better. It is NOT about selling product. I strongly ascribe to the stoic view that if you do the right thing, rewards will naturally follow. If you focus on short-term rewards, you will not be successful, especially not in the long run.

Here are three characteristics of educational technology stories worth telling:

  1. Giving credit where credit is due – it is wrong for an educational technology company (or funder, or association, or government) to take credit for the success of an institution. Case studies should always be created with a view to accurately documenting the steps taken by an institution to see results. This story might feature a particular product as a necessary condition of success, but it should also highlight those high impact practices that could be replicated, adapted, and scaled in other contexts regardless of the technology used. It is the task of the marketer to make higher education better by acting as a servant in promoting the people and institutions that are making a real impact.
  2. Refusing to lie with numbers – there was a time in the not-so-distant past when educational technology companies suffered from the irony of selling analytics products without any evidence of their impact. Today, those same companies suffer from another terrible irony: using bad data science to sell data products. Good data science doesn’t always result in the sexiest stories, even it it’s results are significant. It is a lazy marketer who twists the numbers to make headlines. It is the task of a good marketer to understand and communicate the significance of small victories, to popularize the insights that make data scientists excited, but that might sound trivial and obscure to the general public without the right perspective..
  3. Expressing the possible – A good marketer should know their products, and they should know their users. They should be empathetic in appreciating the challenges facing students, instructors, and administrators and work tirelessly as a partner in change. A good marketer does not stand at the periphery.  They get involved because they ARE involved.  A good marketer moves beyond product features and competitive positioning, and toward the articulation of concrete and specific ways of using a technology to meet the needs of students, teachers, and administrators a constantly changing world.

Suffice it to say, good marketing is hard to do. It requires domain expertise and empathy. It is not formulaic. Good educational technology marketing involves telling authentic stories that make education better. It is about telling stories that NEED to be told.

If a marketer can’t say something IMPORTANT, they shouldn’t say anything at all.

3 strategies for dealing with public speaking anxiety: Lessons from a pro athlete

Fans often ask my wife, pro equestrian Elisa Wallace, if she still gets nervous. Her answer is always: yes.

Even at the highest levels of equestrian competition, it is not uncommon for athletes to involuntarily evacuate the contents of their stomach before an event. With pressure coming from large numbers of spectators (in person and on television), the hopes and dreams of fans and country, and — most importantly — the internal desire to do justice to the potential of her equine partner, a spike in adrenaline is impossible to avoid.

That involuntary physiological response is completely natural. It is a function of the fact that Elisa cares. If it didn’t happen, something would be wrong.

I’ve been thinking a lot about this this adrenaline response in my own professional life. Although still relatively new to speaking in front of very large audiences, I’ve been public speaking now for a long time, both as a teacher and as a scholar. It seems that no matter how much experience I get, I can’t overcome the experience of an involuntary adrenaline response prior to taking a stage.

This is something that I worry about, since I know that this response has an impact on my ability to think clearly, and to recall even the most well-practiced talk tracks. I worry about a quivering voice. I worry about fumbling about on stage, dropping things, and losing my train of thought.

Recently, I asked my wife how she deals with this kind of pre- performance stress response. She gave me three pieces of advice, based on her own experience as a professional athlete:

1. Embrace it.

The only reason you experience an adrenaline response prior to engaging in a public activity (or any activity for that matter) is that you care. That’s a good thing. The worst thing you can do is to stress out about stressing out. Instead, expect your adrenaline to spike and embrace it as an important part of your process. By simply reinterpreting this physiological response as working for you instead of against you, you can transform a hindrance into a helper.

2. You deserve to be there.

A lot of our anxiety comes from insecurity. For anyone with a realistic self-concept, it can be difficult to overcome ‘impostor syndrome.’ Whether you are a professional athlete or a public speaker, remember that you have worked hard, and the only reason you are there is because others want to see you there. You are there because you are already respected, and others already value your opinion. You have nothing to prove. Just do what you came to do.

3. Get pumped.

(1) and (2) are about mindset. This point is about how to get there. Many professional athletes have mastered the art of creating portable fortresses of solitude. They put their headphones on, listen to music, and tune out. Elisa has a ‘pump up’ playlist on her phone. Prior to going on cross country (the most thrilling and dangerous of her three phases), listening to music is helpful in two ways. It simultaneously (and paradoxically) helps you to tune out extraneous information so you can focus on the task at hand, and distracts you (in a productive way) from the importance of what you are about to do. Preference, of course, is music with driving bass lines, which we know from research has the effect of boosting confidence as well.


Originally published to horsehubby.com

What is product marketing? A kind of manifesto

There is remarkably little written about product marketing.

For the last month, I have been tracking the terms “Product Marketing” and “Product Marketer” using Google alerts. In that time, except for a few exceptions, all I have see are job advertisements. A LOT of job advertisements. For a position that is in such high demand, the fact that there is so little written about it is remarkable indeed.

So, what is product marketing? It’s complicated.

It is commonly accepted that product marketing exists at the intersection of marketing, product management, and sales. A product marketer ‘owns’ messaging for a product or product line. In support of field and central marketing, they work to ensure that what a product ‘means’ is coherent, consistent with broader corporate messaging and brand standards, and compelling to a full range of buying personas. The messaging produced by a product marketer comes to life in two forms: through outward-facing collateral used for demand generation, and inward-facing resources used for sales enablement.

So what is a product marketer? They are a story-teller who serves the interests of marketing, product, and sales through the creation of messaging that is coherent, consistent, and compelling.

It would be easy to stop here and think of the product marketer as a person in the present, as someone who creates stories that strike a balance between the three types of organizational interest it serves. Is a product marketer someone who creates messages that ‘work’ here and now? Yes. But if we also take seriously the role of a product marketer in creating, not just meaning, but also vision, then the product marketer also bears a kind of responsibility to the future. And as it turns out, the most effective and impactful product narratives are those that point beyond an immediate need and toward a future in which a thing is not only useful, but also important.

For me, the most exciting part of product marketing is its relationship to product management. This relationship is not one-way. It is not as if product management creates a thing, and then hands it to ‘the marketing guy’ to ‘market.’ To the extent that a product marketer is responsible for what a thing means, they also have a direct impact on what it becomes. With a meaning that is coherent, consistent, and compelling comes an understanding of the problems and needs of the market. It also necessarily defines values. By working with product management to understand, not just what is possible, but also what is meaningful, the product marketer importantly contributes to a vision for a product that is actualized in the form of a roadmap.

If you can’t say something important, don’t say anything at all.

How common is the commitment to importance among product marketers? I can’t say. But I would like to think that a commitment to importance is essential to being an excellent product marketer. It renders the role itself important (as opposed to merely useful). But with importance comes greater responsibility. It means developing domain expertise over and above the general expertise of being a product marketer. With domain expertise comes a greater sense of empathy for the industries your product supports.

The minute that a product marketer shifts their perspective from the present to the future, their locus of responsibility also changes. Focused on the present, the product marketer is an advocate on behalf of the product to the market. Focused on the future, the product marketer serves as an advocate to the product on behalf of the market.

What, then, is a product marketer? They are a story-teller who advocates on behalf of the market to an organization’s marketing, product, and sales departments through the creation of narratives that are coherent, consistent, and compelling.