Five Must-See Analytics Sessions at EDUCAUSE 2016

EDUCAUSE is big.  Really big. With so much to take in, conference-goers (myself included) are easily faced with the paradox of choice: a sense of paralysis in the face of too many options.  To help myself and others, I have scanned this year’s conference agenda and selected five presentations that I think will be individually strong, and that as a group offer a good overview of the themes, issues, and state of analytics in higher education today.

Learning at Scale with Analytics: Findings from the Field and Open Questions

Wednesday, October 26, 2016 | 3:40 PM – 4:30 PM | Meeting Room 204B

Moderated by Michael Feldstein (e-Literate), and featuring John Whitmer (Blackboard), Russ Little (PAR), and Jeff Gold (California State University), and Avi Yashchin (IBM), this session promises to provide an engaging and insightful overview of why analytics are important for higher education, the biggest challenges currently facing the field, and opportunities for the future.  Although most of the speakers are strongly affiliated with vendors in the analytics space, they are strong data scientists in their own right and have demonstrated time and time again that they do not shy from critical honesty.  Attend this session for a raw glimpse into what analytics mean for higher education today.

Deploying Open Learning Analytics at National Scale: Lessons from the Real World

Thursday, October 27 | 8:00am – 8:50am | Ballroom A, Level Three

Jisc is a non-profit company that aims to create and maintain a set of shared services in support of higher education in the UK.  The Effective Learning Analytics project that Michael Webb will discuss in this session has aimed to provide a centralized learning analytics solution in addition to a library of shared resources.  The outputs of this project to date have valuable resources  to the international educational analytics community in general, including Code of practice for learning analytics and Learning Analytics in Higher Education.  Jisc’s work is being watched carefully by governments and non-governmental organizations worldwide and represents an approach that we may wish to consider emulating in the US (current laws notwithstanding).  Attend this session to learn about the costs and opportunities involved in the development of a centralized approach to collecting and distributing educational data.

Founding a Data Democracy: How Ivy Tech is Leading a Revolution in Higher Education

Thursday, October 27 | 1:30pm – 2:20pm | Meeting Room 202A/B, Level Two

The higher education community is abuzz with talk of how data and analytics can improve student success.  But data and analytics are worthless unless they are put in the hands of the right people and in the right ways.  I am really interested to see how Ivy Tech has worked to successfully democratize access to information, and also about the ways that access to data has driven the kind of institutional and cultural change necessary to see the most significant results from data-driven initiatives.

Analytics and Student Success: Research and Benchmarking

Thursday, October 27 | 8:00am – 8:50am | Meeting Room 304A/B, Level Three

Everyone’s talking about analytics, and every institution seemingly has the will to invest.  Attention paid to analytics in media and by vendors can lead to the impression that everybody’s doing it, and that everyone who’s doing it is seeing great results.  But the truth is far from the case.

I’m not the greatest fan of benchmarking in general.  Too often, benchmarking is productized by vendors and sold to universities despite providing very little actionable value.  Worse yet, they can exacerbate feelings of institutional insecurity and drive imprudent investments.  But when it comes to analytics, benchmarking done right can provide important evidence to counteract misperceptions about the general state of analytics in the US, and provide institutions with valuable information to inform prudent investment, planning, and policy decisions.  In this presentation, I look forward to hearing Christopher Brooks and Jeffery Pomerantz from EDUCAUSE discuss their work on the analytics and student success benchmarking tools.

Building with LEGOs: Leveraging Open Standards for Learning Analytics Data

Friday, October 28 | 8:00am – 8:50am | Meeting Room 304C/D, Level Three

I am a huge advocate of open standards in learning analytics.  Open standards mean greater amounts of higher quality data.  They mean that vendors and data scientists can spend more time innovating and less time just trying to get plumbing to work.  In this interactive presentation, Malcolm Brown (EDUCAUSE), Jenn Stringer (University of California, Berkeley), Sean DeMonner (University of Michigan-Ann Arbor), and Virginia Lacefield (University of Kentucky) talk about how open learning standards like IMS Caliper and xAPI are creating the foundation for the emergence of next generation learning environments.


Also published on Medium.